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    Sarah Gatehouse.

    Fujitsu General Australia

    "In 2016 we rolled out intelliHR, and in 2017 we had our best financial year yet. That makes a massive statement to show how valuable an investment in people and technology can be."

  • Sarah Gatehouse

    Sarah Gatehouse.

    Fujitsu General Australia

    "With the implementation of intelliHR, the improvements in our culture are clearly visible. intelliHR is a tool that helps with our strategic cultural goal of being a great place to work, with improved engagement, communication and goal management now well on track."

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    Sheldon Commercial Interiors

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| 5 min
Employee Experience Explained
Like much HR jargon, Employee Experience is not a term that is easily understood; it’s not simple nor straightforward. Recently it’s become increasingly important, emerging as a top priority for HR and Business Leaders...
| 10 min
Maximise your onboarding process with the right HR software
The onboarding period is a crucial time to set people up for success in your organisation. Most new employees form a decision on whether they want to stay or leave a company within their...
| 5 min
4 Ways the Digital People Management Transformation is Empowering Employees
Today, information is instantaneously available and has become a highly valuable commodity. Couple this with the advanced analytics tools increasingly available to us, and organisations have more opportunity than ever to get ahead. But organisations...
| 5 min
Onboarding: A big upfront investment, and a big opportunity to increase profitability
It’s no secret that it typically takes employees some period of time to start adding value to the business when they start fresh in a new role or a new organisation. In their first...

Employee Experience Explained

Like much HR jargon, Employee Experience is not a term that is easily understood; it’s not simple nor straightforward. Recently it’s become increasingly important, emerging as a top priority for HR and Business Leaders in the face of fierce talent competition. But what do we mean by “Employee Experience”? And, more importantly, how do we improve it?

Traditionally, the employee experience is the way a person perceives everything in their employee journey at an organisation. This spans across process, technology, social and physical landscapes.

It’s the way a person feels as a result of how they are treated in their job: the first day on the job to the last, access to technology, culture, mentorship, onboarding process, training, reviews, social activities… you get the point.  Everything that occurs in the lifestyle of an employee, viewed from the Employee’s experiential lens.

Improving Employee Experience does not need to be a mammoth task, in fact, it can simply start with many small process changes that add up to an overall great experience for employees.

“Employee experience is the journey an employee takes with your company”
Gallup

Employee experience is the journey an employee takes with your company

e.g. The way a new hire feels after their onboarding process would be an indicator of their employee experience up to that point.

The employee experience is essentially about all the little details.

Getting these details right, consistently and with input from employees, is the best strategy to improving their experience. Being able to systemise and codify processes, iterate and then receive feedback on changes allows you to continually improve.

As an ongoing journey the experience is not static, it’s subject to daily variation. This is a good thing, as it means there is always an opportunity to improve this pivotal aspect of an organisation.

The importance of Employee Experience: Why?

A good Employee Experience is good for business.

“companies that invest in EX outperform the ones that don’t by 4.2x”

Employee experience drives both a company’s culture and individual performance. Improvements in the Employee’s experience can drive engagement, reduce performance ramp up time, lower attrition and contribute to organisational effectiveness.

Studies show well designed employee experiences lead to greater levels of engagement, involvement, enthusiasm and employer brand commitment. In fact, Gallup released research proving a correlation between higher employee engagement and profitability.

Understanding before improving: hacking E.X. with feedback

For HR and Business leaders, the first step towards improving the Employee Experience (E.X.) is using feedback to hack into the employee’s perspective. Rather than designing an experience without comprehending the end user’s perception, HR can avoid guesswork by using employee feedback as a navigating tool to continually optimise and improve E.X.

Gathering and analysing feedback is critical to an employee experience strategy, in designing your feedback approach you can start with these three touchpoints:

  • Onboarding: collecting feedback from first impressions on day 1, and then again at the end of the first week, with targeted questions around expectations during recruitment compared to experience, areas of assistance and hypothetical changes
  • Check-ins: gathering feedback during check-ins throughout the year, in a continuous feedback fashion, can provide great insights into the E.X. picture
  • Offboarding/Exit: Asking for feedback from employees who voluntarily leave the organisation can provide valuable insights into the employee experience causes behind attrition
    The important thing is to start collecting the data, to enrich the employee experience story. By collecting data at every stage, you can understand the impact of your improvements and continue to optimise.

The focus should be on gathering feedback around the problems you are  trying to solve, for example is there a long ramp up time for new team members? Maybe onboarding and post-onboarding collection points would be useful. Disengaged long-tenure employees an issue? Regular check in’s could be a good starting point, following up with some strategic alignment through goal setting.

Importantly, feedback loops are most useful when used to identify the underlying roots of much larger symptoms, such as high attrition. To do this, a framework to analyse the feedback is imperative. Whether you use digital tools, like sentiment analysis, or other data aggregation and transformation methods, HR has a responsibility to present feedback data in a way that provides insight and drives strategy.

 

Improving

Once feedback data has been collected and analysed, trends highlighted around different processes and E.X. factors within the business can be used to formulate strategy. At this stage, it’s imperative for HR to look for the quick wins, whilst still addressing underlying deeper challenges through a longer term lens.

For example

Onboarding feedback: “I didn’t know who to ask for technical help with certain systems, and was nervous to ask the busy IT team.”

Example Solution 1

  1. Quick win – Ask managers pre-onboarding to write a list for IT system assistance that is given to starters.
  2. Long term – create a digital directory of system responsibility that can be searched and updated by employees.

Engagement feedback: “I would like more training, but it doesn’t seem as if this is a priority of my manager and I’m not sure where to go.”

Example Solution 2

  1. Quick win – Make requests for training as easy and visible as possible by asking for them in manager check-ins.
  2. Long term – automate reminders that prompt managers and employees about training needs, build a self service training request portal.

The real how of making these changes lies in being able to systemise them and record feedback to continually adjust your improvements. Without processes that are systemised, you are exposed to human error and half-completed tasks. It also becomes difficult to attribute feedback to improvements.

Importantly, after implementing a change that will impact the employee experience HR should collect feedback around the changes. This allows you to measure improvements and provide leadership with concrete evidence that your new strategy is working.

 

Takeaways

  1. Employee experience is a person’s journey throughout an organisation, and is a focus for HR strategy in 2019.
  2. Use feedback to understand and identify areas of the employee experience that could be improved.
  3. Design a ‘quick-win’ and long term strategy, then ensure to measure the impact.

Improving your employee experience is about doing a whole lot of little things right, consistently. This is where a system can help you drive your strategy. Find out more here.

 


Maximise your onboarding process with the right HR software

The onboarding period is a crucial time to set people up for success in your organisation. Most new employees form a decision on whether they want to stay or leave a company within their first 90 days, so first impressions count. In fact, a 2017 study revealed one in five employees leave before even completing their probation period [1].

A successful onboarding period will not only aid in retention and engagement, but should also aim to maximise ROI and fulfill compliance requirements.

In this guide we will explore how HR software can be utilised to maximise your onboarding process within these three key areas: compliance, retention and ROI.

 

Maximise Compliance

The right HR software should not only streamline the onboarding process and cut out administration time but also add value to the process by minimising errors and strengthening record keeping.

Setting up an automated onboarding workflow will help ensure nothing slips through the cracks and all employees have a consistent onboarding process. You can even create different workflows for different roles or business units if they require slightly different steps to be completed.

Here are just some of the steps you can include when setting up your onboarding workflow to help maximise compliance:

 

1. Track Qualifications

Allow new starters to input their mandatory qualifications like working with children checks, machinery licenses or other certifications. The individual and the HR team will be notified when these are due to expire.

 

2. Handle Policy Acceptance

Deliver all relevant policies to new hires, allowing them to read and accept as part of their onboarding. Managers and employees will receive notifications about any policies that have not been signed off yet so nothing gets forgotten.

 

3. Fulfill Statutory Requirements

Your automated onboarding workflow should also enable you to easily fulfill all employment law and statutory requirements. This could include gathering necessary information from employees that might impact on their entitlements to ensure these are delivered or providing information to employees that makes them aware of their rights at work.

 

Are you making any of these 5 common compliance mistakes? Learn how to avoid them here.


Maximise Retention

Getting started in a new company can be a significant learning curve. Not only will your new starter be undergoing training of relevant systems and procedures but doing so whilst entrenched in a whole new set of company values, goals and culture norms. Even seemingly small things like learning their way around the building, getting to know coworkers or discovering the best places to get coffee nearby are all important steps that every employee must take to really feel comfortable in their new position.

Helping your new employees feel at home in their new role is the first step toward keeping them engaged in your workplace. Let’s explore a few ways HR software can be used to support this:

 

1. Maintain continuous feedback with your team

Pulses are an automation tool that can be used to send out periodic emails to staff, inviting them to complete a form in intelliHR. This allows your organisation to easily engage in continuous feedback, which should be conducted with all staff old and new, but the forms you send out can be tailored toward different stages of the employee lifecycle.

For example, you may choose to set up a pulse that goes to new starters at the end of their second week to check in on how they are settling in. Here are a few sample questions you might want to include:

  • Do you know where to find spare stationery items?
  • On a scale of 1 to 10, rate how you are feeling about your new role.
  • Do you feel you have everything you need to do your job?
  • Let us know if there is anything else you’d like to talk about.

 

2. Monitor sentiment for real-time insights

Check-ins will provide good insights into how people are feeling in their new role, but we can take this one step further by looking at the underlying emotional tone behind their responses. And this does not just apply to check-ins either, intelliHR’s Sentiment Analysis feature also looks at diary notes, goal comments and more to reveal the emotional tone behind responses. This data will be available for every employee, but in the case of onboarding, the management team can filter down to look at employees in their first year an see how they are feeling and why. These insights are invaluable for identifying potential problems early and acting on them before new hires become disengaged.

 

Get more tips on retaining the right staff here.


Maximise ROI

With retention comes ROI. Why? Because it takes time for new employees to reach their full potential. The biggest opportunity for ROI in your business is getting people performing at their peak early, and keeping them there for as long as possible.

This process can take time as people find their feet in a new role. Even the most experienced hire will still take some time to fully align themselves to a new organisation. During this period, the new employee is generally a direct cost to the business as they are not necessarily producing outputs yet. In knowledge-based roles, this journey can take many months.

The graph below demonstrates how employees typically progress from an initial investment phase to a point where they are generating returns for the organisation.

employee lifecycle performance curve
The Employee Lifecycle Performance Curve

 

Learn more about the Employee Lifecycle Performance Curve here.

 

As a leader, understanding the learning curve will help you identify how staff progress from an initial investment or onboarding phase to a point where they are performing (and being profitable) for the company. This will help you interpret how to get the best out of your people. The key here is to shorten the time in that initial investment period by equipping your new hires with an onboarding process that gears them with all the tools they need to succeed, helping them reach peak performance sooner.

These are just some of the tools successful managers are leveraging to achieve this:

 

1. Automate Onboarding

An automated, online onboarding process not only reduces the admin burden on managers and maximises compliance, but also allows new starters to get setup in your organisation quickly and without the inconvenience of paperwork.

With intelliHR you can leverage automated email reminders inviting staff to undertake all necessary tasks to get started from recording their qualifications, to entering their emergency contact details and even setting the first goal they want to achieve in their new position.

What’s more, an automated process allows you to streamline and control the onboarding experience, meaning every new starter gets a consistent and enjoyable first interaction with your organisation.

On top of helping new starters get set up in their new role, onboarding can help accelerate performance by exposing new starters to culture norms within the organisation and helping them feel they fit in faster.

This could be achieved by:

  • Informing new starters about current organisation-wide goals as well as the company vision, mission and values so they understand how they can help embody these and also contribute to the bigger picture.
  • Including information about regular office activities and routines so to maximise participation and sense of inclusion.
  • Delivering activities for new staff that encourage them to have a conversation with one person from another team (or multiple) to help understand the roles of others and how they can work together, while starting to form relationships.

 

2. Invest in Training

New starters in your organisation will typically be required to undertake some training, particularly in entry-level roles where people are honing new skill sets. Training requires a significant investment of money and time, so it’s essential to be able to measure the ROI generated from this training. Training and its value can all be recorded and tracked within intelliHR.

Most importantly, you’ll be able to measure the ROI of different programs or courses over time and use this data to select the most worthwhile training opportunities for different teams to undertake.

 

3. Get people engaged early with goals

As we mentioned earlier, employees decide if they will stay or leave an organisation in the first 90 days, so it’s important to give new starters a taste of their role’s full potential as early as possible. Never underestimate what your people are capable of, give them the opportunity to extend themselves and show what they’re capable of in a low-risk scenario. Limiting new hires to menial tasks could leave them bored and take away the opportunity for them to demonstrate their true value.

How can your HR software help with this? Use your system to set three core goals for all new hires within their first two weeks to ensure they have something to work towards and a sense of purpose. To conceive these goals, managers should meet with their new direct reports one-on-one and collaboratively derive these initial goals from high-level objectives to ensure alignment across the business.

 

See how other organisations are improving their onboarding processes and learn how you can too in this report


SOURCES

[1] People Management (2017). One in five employees have left a job during their probation period. https://www.peoplemanagement.co.uk/news/articles/employees-leaving-job-during-probation


4 Ways the Digital People Management Transformation is Empowering Employees

Today, information is instantaneously available and has become a highly valuable commodity. Couple this with the advanced analytics tools increasingly available to us, and organisations have more opportunity than ever to get ahead. But organisations are only as successful as the people behind them, so how can the digital transformation empower employees to do their best work every day?

In this article we will cover just a few of the areas where transforming your people management process can directly empower your people.

1. Listen and make improvements in real-time

It can be difficult to stay across the sentiment and happiness of everyone at all times, particularly in larger companies. Artificial Intelligence tools like Sentiment Analysis and Keyword Analysis allow us to analyse large amounts of qualitative data.

Now we can extract value from answers in continuous feedback, employee engagement surveys, diary notes and other sources at scale. Words and phrases are analysed to determine if a positive or negative emotional tone lies behind them and these insights can uncover business units or individuals who need help (or recognition!).

In this way, problems no longer need to go unnoticed, and organisations can create better working environments by tackling problems and rewarding high performance. Historically, organisations would discover issues through exit surveys, annual performance reviews, or looking at past financial performance. In other words, a problem could only be identified long after it was too late to do anything about it. Today we can look at real-time data, and even project insights into the future.

 

How is sentiment tracking across the organisation? Is it trending up or down?

Where are my high or low performers in the business?

Which areas of my business are costing me and which are delivering a positive return? Why?

Which managers have the highest attrition rates in their teams?

What training initiatives are generating the biggest return on investment?

 

Can you answer these questions on the spot? Advanced people management platforms are already able to provide these insights, and the capabilities are increasing every day. Armed with this knowledge we can proactively alleviate employee concerns early and take steps to solve problems before they escalate.

 

2. Provide self-led tools

Employees today want to take control of their own development and get performing at their peak potential. With this, employees expect to be able to self-manage aspects of their employment. Organisations that embrace this and provide their people with engaging, user-friendly people management tools will not only benefit from a more engaged workforce but will also gather more meaningful insights from analytics as employees will be actively engaging with the software and be on top of their own performance.

Some of the features employees will most appreciate and want to engage with include goal setting and tracking, continuous feedback “check-ins” and instant performance reports. Equipped with these tools, people feel instantly more engaged and in-control of their role. Most importantly, these tools work best when embedded in a workplace culture that encourages open communication through regular two-way feedback and clearly articulated expectations. Both of these are key drivers for empowering employees.

 

3. People friendly processes

The digital transformation is in full swing and it’s happening all around us. These changes will make our lives easier and decisions stronger but first we need to let go of traditional processes.

Think of performance reviews: historically, review time meant mountains of admininstration and paper. So it’s no surprise most organisations would only undertake them annually. Today we have sophisticated automation tools and systems that automatically email regular check-in forms to individual staff, provide their manager with an update and capture valuable data for analytics.

Not only is this a huge time-cost saving but it’s providing a more accurate snapshot of employee performance. When this process is seamlessly integrated with analytics, we can process the data in a scalable way that allows us to understand how people are feeling, regardless of an organisation’s size or spread. What’s more, by getting real-time, on-demand performance reporting, employees and their managers get the opportunity to fill skills gaps or find solutions to blockers straight away, allowing every team member to keep performing at their peak.

Traditional performance reviews become redundant when automated reporting is coupled with regular check-ins. This new process is far superior and more productive than annual reviews where everything is considered in retrospect, often leaving it too late to action solutions.

It also saves the undue stress and angst employees often experience with annual performance reviews as they often have to spend a lot of time scoring themselves and trying to prepare for a nerve-wracking meeting often with no real productive outcome.

 

4. Business adjusting its mindset

The digital transformation is prompting organisations to think differently about how they manage their people. Businesses who adapt their thinking to the modern work landscape will benefit from higher engagement and the flow on effects of better performance, lower attrition and increased business outcomes.

With the rise of remote work and flexible office arrangements, businesses must accommodate these expectations to attract the best talent. Coupling this with leveraging technology to connect and communicate effectively. Facilitating regular check-ins to get better visibility over performance and using real-time sentiment analysis is a great first step toward enabling remote work and empowering employees.

Not sure where to start? If you’re lacking the tools to leverage your people data and stay competitive, book a time to chat with us or call 1800 993 803.

 


Onboarding: A big upfront investment, and a big opportunity to increase profitability

It’s no secret that it typically takes employees some period of time to start adding value to the business when they start fresh in a new role or a new organisation.

In their first three to six months, new hires are trying to settle into their role. They have onboarding processes and relevant training of systems and procedures to complete, all whilst gaining an understanding of, and being entrenched in, a whole new set of company values, goals and culture norms. Even seemingly small things like learning their way around the building, getting to know coworkers or discovering the best places to get coffee nearby are all important steps that every employee must take to really feel comfortable in their new position.

The Learning Curve

The learning curve journey can take time, and you can expect that even the most experienced hire will still take some time to fully align themselves to their new organisation. During this period, the new employee is generally a direct cost to the business as they are not necessarily producing. Naturally, the simpler the role, the faster that productivity starts to happen. In knowledge-based roles, however, this journey can be extended over many months.

The graphic below demonstrates how employees typically progress from an initial investment phase to a point where they are generating returns for their organisation.

 

employee lifecycle performance curve
The Employee Lifecycle Performance Curve

 

Blog: How to generate ROI on your People + 3 quick win ROI tips for HR

 

Onboarding: an ROI critical control point

A successful onboarding process will shorten this initial investment phase allowing employees to reach their peak potential sooner. On top of this short-term benefit, the onboarding process is critical to an employee’s long-term retention in an organisation. Most new employees form a decision on whether they want to stay or leave a company within their first 90 days, so first impressions count. In fact, a 2017 study revealed one in five employees leave before even completing their probation period [1].

“one in five employees leave before even completing their probation period”

For this reason, it is vital that employees not only have a great first impression of working in your business but also that leaders are able to monitor how the new employee is going and if there are any early issues that need to be addressed. For organisations using intelliHR, new starters can enjoy a painless and paper-work free onboarding experience. Automated email reminders invite them to undertake all necessary tasks to get started from recording their qualifications, to entering their emergency contact details and even setting the first goal they want to achieve in their new position. With everything completed in an intuitive and appealing system, new hires can get set up for success in their new role straight away, without creating any additional work for the HR team or other leaders in the business.

 

Report: See how other organisations are improving their onboarding processes and learn how you can to in this report

 

If organisations lack these tools and new staff members are leaving before they’ve even entered the profitable performance phase, this equates to a lot of money out the door. That’s why intelliHR’s world class analytics and people management tools were developed to enable organisations to boost engagement in the onboarding process, maximise return on investment (ROI) and reduce attrition.

To understand how these outcomes look in your own organisation, it is a worthwhile exercise to understand the cost dimensions of time and speed to performance to truly understand the financial investment being made in every new employee.

 

Calculator: Discover the cost of employee turnover in your business with this free calculator

 

Empowered with this knowledge, we can influence a new hire’s speed to break even, acceleration to peak performance and how long their productivity level lasts. We can also help take it to new levels!

 

SOURCES

[1] People Management (2017). One in five employees have left a job during their probation period. https://www.peoplemanagement.co.uk/news/articles/employees-leaving-job-during-probation


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