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  • Sarah Gatehouse

    Sarah Gatehouse.

    Fujitsu General Australia

    "In 2016 we rolled out intelliHR, and in 2017 we had our best financial year yet. That makes a massive statement to show how valuable an investment in people and technology can be."

  • Sarah Gatehouse

    Sarah Gatehouse.

    Fujitsu General Australia

    "With the implementation of intelliHR, the improvements in our culture are clearly visible. intelliHR is a tool that helps with our strategic cultural goal of being a great place to work, with improved engagement, communication and goal management now well on track."

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    Belinda Maybury.

    Sheldon Commercial Interiors

    "The support and customer service from intelliHR and Customer Success Manager, Glenn has been phenomenal."

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| 15 min
The intelliHR guide to future-proofing your organisation
In today’s landscape, business transformation is not only inevitable, it’s vital for organisations to survive. Businesses that foresee disruption and adapt accordingly will be able to survive and gain competitive advantages. If you are...
| 5 min
Leading a business? Here’s why turning a blind-eye to technology is not an option
Our CEO, Rob Bromage, recently presented to MBA students at the University of Queensland about The Future of Work. Here’s a recap of Rob’s talk. If you follow the excitement of the latest technologies...
| 5 min
What new leaders need to know
Stepping into a management role for the first time can be daunting, but it helps to draw on the experience of others to start off on the right foot. We’ve done the groundwork for you,...
| 5 min
Why leadership skills are important for managers
Promoting any team member to their first management role is often regarded as the peak of recognition, but leadership isn’t a responsibility that should just be freely bestowed to anyone capable of reaching their...
| 5 min
How to measure leadership skills
We all know the importance of strong leadership skills in the workplace, but like most soft skills, they are all too often overlooked. This is usually due to a perception that leadership skills are...
| 5 min
What skills do leaders need today?
Leadership skills are essential for every individual in an organisation, whether they manage a team or not. In this article we will look at seven core skills leaders need today and how you can...

The intelliHR guide to future-proofing your organisation

In today’s landscape, business transformation is not only inevitable, it’s vital for organisations to survive. Businesses that foresee disruption and adapt accordingly will be able to survive and gain competitive advantages.

If you are in a leadership position, it is your role to guide your business through one of the most technology-fuelled and disruptive transitions that businesses may have ever seen. Ignore what’s happening around us, and your business will stagnate and be left behind. First your staff will start leaving, and then your customers will follow suit. Now nobody wants that!

Larry Fink, Blackrock Chairman & CEO brought this to the world stage earlier this year when he stated in a letter to all CEOs:

“We see many governments failing to prepare for the future, on issues ranging from retirement and infrastructure to automation and worker retraining. As a result, society increasingly is turning to the private sector and asking that companies respond to broader societal challenges.

…To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society. Companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.”

 

Today’s future-focused businesses must be agile, bringing workforces into alignment and engaging them with purpose. Today’s worker is a knowledge worker and they are not looking to be told what to do, but given a purpose and a direction to head in, and most importantly the freedom to execute it.

Many organisations are already doing this successfully, but it is not always easy and if you’re facing challenges in transitioning you are certainly not alone.

In this guide we will explore how you as a HR leader can contribute to future-proofing your organisation.


First, adjust your mindset…

The digital transformation is prompting organisations to think differently about how they manage their people. Businesses who adapt their thinking to the modern work landscape will benefit from higher engagement and the flow on effects of better performance, lower attrition and increased business outcomes.

 

Think People, Product, Profit

What do many leading innovative companies today have in common? You’ve probably noticed many of today’s tech giants and Silicon Valley success stories have slightly unorthodox management structures, interview processes and even dress codes (or lack thereof).

This doesn’t mean you should fire all of your middle management, start hiring people based on their favourite TimTam flavour or let everyone wear sneakers to work, but what it does mean is you should do whatever it reasonably takes to put your people first.

What we’re talking about is the mantra of people, product, profit. That is, focus on hiring and retaining a great group of people and you’ll be able to create a great product, and in turn, generate significant profit.

But attracting and retaining the best talent can only happen if you create an environment where people feel valued and empowered to do their best work. If that means installing sleeping pods and getting an in-house barista, then so be it, but keep in mind these perks can wear off pretty fast if your people feel they don’t have a voice.

Empowering your people starts with giving them the tools to do their best work every day. If you’re doing these things already, congratulations, you’re on the right track. If you’re not, think of the following sections in this guide as a checklist to help you navigate what lies ahead.


Next, empower your people

As always, having a happy and high performing team is crucial to your organisation’s future success. Thankfully, with the technology and tools available today, it is easier than ever to measure and improve employee engagement and foster improved performance.

Here are some of our top tips on bringing your HR processes into the future and empowering your people in the process.

 

1. Complement annual performance appraisals with regular check-ins

An automated check-in every few weeks gives every employee a chance to provide real-time feedback to questions like:

  • On a scale of 1 to 10, rate your happiness.
  • How are you progressing with your goals?
  • What have you achieved recently that you are proud of?
  • Do you require any type of support or extra training?

The answers to questions like these, inform one-on-one catch-ups between every manager and their direct reports, helping start meaningful conversations and drive a culture based on open communication and feedback.

The biggest benefit of a process like this is that any potential issues can be identified and handled proactively before they escalate. Furthermore, employees actually see value in giving this kind of feedback, as it is not only read, but acknowledged by the manager and (hopefully) acted on.

 

2. Make proactive and informed decisions

Historically, data was generally kept for legislative and record keeping purposes and to manually sift through every file and analyse the data with any accuracy was simply not realistic. Today however, thanks to cloud-based platforms and real-time reporting capabilities, people analytics metrics can be captured instantaneously and then used to inform, influence and determine the strategic-direction for the company.

One example is employee engagement data. In the past it was difficult (if not impossible) to stay across the sentiment and happiness of every employee at all times, particularly in larger companies. Today though, Artificial Intelligence tools like Sentiment Analysis and Keyword Analysis allow us to do this by automatically analysing and interpreting large amounts of qualitative data.

Now we can extract value from answers in continuous feedback, employee engagement surveys, diary notes and other sources at scale. Words and phrases are analysed to determine if a positive or negative emotional tone lies behind them and these insights can uncover business units or individuals who need help (or recognition!).

In this way, problems no longer need to go unnoticed, and organisations can create better working environments by tackling problems and rewarding high performance. Historically, organisations would discover issues through exit surveys, annual reviews, or looking at past financial performance. In other words, a problem could only be identified long after it was too late to do anything about it. Today we can look at real-time data, and even project insights into the future.

  • How is sentiment tracking across the organisation? Is it trending up or down?
  • Where are my high or low performers in the business?
  • Which areas of my business are costing me and which are delivering a positive return? Why?
  • Which managers have the highest attrition rates in their teams?
  • What training initiatives are generating the biggest return on investment?

Can you answer these questions on the spot? Advanced people management platforms (like intelliHR) are already able to provide these insights, and the capabilities are increasing every day. Armed with this knowledge we can proactively alleviate employee concerns early and take steps to solve problems before they escalate.

 

3. Provide self-led tools

Employees today want to take control of their own development and get performing at their peak potential. With this, employees expect to be able to self-manage aspects of their employment. Organisations that embrace this and provide their people with engaging, user-friendly people management tools will not only benefit from a more engaged workforce but will also gather more meaningful insights from analytics as employees will be actively engaging with the software and be on top of their own performance.

Some of the features employees will most appreciate and want to engage with include goal setting and tracking, continuous feedback “check-ins” and instant performance reports. Equipped with these tools, people feel instantly more engaged and in-control of their role. Most importantly, these tools work best when embedded in a workplace culture that encourages open communication through regular two-way feedback and clearly articulated expectations. Both of these are key drivers for empowering employees.

 

4. Rethink your rating scales

No one wants to say they’re ‘below expectations’, and let’s face it, once an employee reaches this point, it might already be too late to help them turn things around. So why even ask questions like these? People come to work wanting to do a good job, but we all experience blockers from time to time. In order to combat these, we need our people to feel comfortable asking for help before it’s too late. We also need to help frame the mind of the manger to the desired outcomes of measuring an employee’s performance to start with. Consider replacing rating scales like ‘Below Expectations’, ‘Meeting Expectations’ and ‘Above Expectations’ with a rating scale like ‘Need Help’, ‘Good Job’ and ‘Great Job’ or similar.

 

5. Make goals meaningful

Too many goals get written at the start of the year only to sit and rot in a spreadsheet for 12 months. Ensuring all employees have goals to work towards is essential for giving your people a sense of direction and purpose, however, goals are only helpful if they actually get worked on and completed.

Too many goals get written at the start of the year only to sit and rot in a spreadsheet for 12 months.

Using the right online system to set and track goals is key for ensuring that goals are actually prioritised – and achieved. Using intelliHR, everyone in the organisation can set their own goals or cascade a shared goal to a team member. Leaders can even have chat-style conversations with their direct reports through goal chat making goals a living and breathing tool supporting strategic alignment and operational delivery. Most importantly, everyone can track their own progress and gain a sense of achievement by actually seeing how they’re contributing to the big picture.

 

6. Encourage lifelong learning

Regardless of an employee’s experience or tenure, there is always room to improve performance, expand their thinking or learn something new. The best employees are those willing to try new things and keep your company at the cutting edge. Make sure you’re encouraging this.

Start by calculating a training budget for each employee. This can be difficult without past data, but know that training is an investment that you can measure against performance to determine ROI. Once you know what training programs are bringing the most value, you can then adjust these budgets accordingly. Don’t forget to factor in time-wage costs for the hours spent undertaking training as well any travel costs incurred.

Even not for profit organisations or those with limited cash can invest in their people by giving a ‘time budget’ for staff to spend on training. There is a plethora of high-quality training courses coming out online that employees can do from the office and are very low cost or even free. Once you have clear guidelines about what training investment you’re willing to make on each employee, and a system to keep track of training, the approval process will be far easier. So now it’s time to start welcoming employees to come forward with what training they want to do.

During regular check-ins with each staff member, make sure managers are asking their people if they feel they would benefit from training or development in any areas. Over time this will foster a culture where lifelong learning is encouraged and your people will feel comfortable asking for training where they will benefit from it most, increasing value for the business.   

 

7. Think about employee experience

Employee experience goes beyond having a nice office or on-site parking. It’s every daily interaction people have with your workplace.

  • Do new starters get buried in compliance paperwork?
  • Is it a mission to get training approved?
  • Does everyone have the resources they need to do their job?

If not managed correctly all of these things can equate to a poor employee experience – no matter how many free coffees you pour on top of it. Ultimately, your people need feedback, recognition, clear expectations and an alignment with the ‘why’ behind what they are doing.

If not managed correctly all of these things can equate to a poor employee experience – no matter how many free coffees you pour on top of it.

By implementing intelliHR, our customers are ensuring all their people have the same great employee experience. The entire onboarding process is completed online in a few clicks, staff members can track and provide feedback on their own training and easily ask for help if they need it.

Of course, a system like this can only provide value to your people if they actually want to use it. To help ensure a high adoption rate among your staff, be sure to select a platform that is user-friendly, enjoyable to use, and makes people want to come back again and again – you might even say, make it addictive. Here at intelliHR, we’ve started integrating gamification concepts into the platform, so every user can feel a sense of accomplishment each time they complete a task, and in turn make everyday tasks into habits that add value.

 

8. Use people-friendly processes

Once you have a user-friendly system in place, it’s time to replace redundant processes and build out new ones that are simple (and enjoyable) to complete.

Think of performance reviews: historically, review time meant mountains of administration and paper. So it’s no surprise most organisations would only undertake them annually. As mentioned earlier, we now have sophisticated automation tools and systems that automatically email regular check-in forms to individual staff, provide their manager with an update and capture valuable data for analytics.

Not only is this a huge time-cost saving but it’s providing a more accurate snapshot of employee performance. When this process is seamlessly integrated with analytics, we can process the data in a scalable way that allows us to understand how people are feeling, regardless of an organisation’s size or spread. What’s more, by getting real-time, on-demand performance reporting, employees and their managers get the opportunity to fill skills gaps or find solutions to blockers straight away, allowing every team member to keep performing at their peak.

Traditional performance reviews become redundant when automated reporting is coupled with regular check-ins. This new process is far superior and more productive than annual reviews where everything is considered in retrospect, often leaving it too late to action solutions. It also saves the undue stress and angst employees often experience with annual performance reviews as they often have to spend a lot of time scoring themselves and trying to prepare for a nerve-wracking meeting often with no real productive outcome.

 

See how McCullough Robertson Lawyers took their performance review process from 49 clicks to just 6.


Selecting the right software

In order to implement the aforementioned processes, you’ll need to select the right HR software that not only enables these processes but actually enhances them. Here’s our advice on what to look for in a new system to ensure it can support your organisation in the long term.

“In this new era, your natural human capabilities are going to be augmented by computational systems that help you think, robotic systems that help you make, and a digital nervous system that connects you to the world far beyond your natural senses” 

– Maurice Conti.

 

1. Choose technology that helps achieve quality at speed

In today’s world, doing things quickly often equates to competitive advantage. If you automate a manual process, you will typically create efficiency, do something faster, save time and money and so on. When it comes to choosing your HR software – or any business purchase – simply ask yourself if it can do all those things for you.

Incremental efficiency gains add up fast. Take sport for example. milliseconds can be the difference between first place and last, and the same applies to business. Saving time and money is winning in business at the end of the day.

Ultimately, competitive advantage is superior profitability relative to your competitors. Efficiency creation should not be a budget planning decision, it should be the execution of a simple, well laid out business case or a policy to have permission to save time and money.

 

2. Ensure your technology will be adopted by your staff

If you are looking at a piece of technology, you have to ask the question: “will people actually use it?” Consider the user experience; adoption of any technology is very important and if something is not enjoyable to use it will not be adopted and will be a waste of money.

For example, if only 30% of your staff use the software, you are only getting 30% of its full value. Where possible, have your intended users participate in the selection process. Well planned implementations, change management and communication strategies are key. Intuitive technology built for user experience makes a significant difference. If you have existing technology that is underutilised, that is also an opportunity. Increase adoption of your existing solution or find something that people will actually use and replace it.

 

3. Select a solution with enough shelf-life

How long will the technology be relevant for? If you have the same system and processes from five years ago and they have not changed or evolved in that time then you are simply standing still. This is where true Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) products are changing their customers’ businesses for the best.

SaaS products are constantly evolving, improving, and advancing fast as new technologies become available. When selecting a shortlist of HR software vendors to choose from, look at their thought leadership. They should be keeping you up to date and at the cutting edge, not only with technology architecture but the domain that they are in as well.

 

4. Know the Jobs to be Done

Whenever you are looking at technology, it’s not about trying to automate a bad process. Take the opportunity to redesign processes based on what you are trying to achieve. What is the problem you are solving? How have you explored it?

Try a design thinking workshop and ensure all key stakeholders are represented in the room – especially your front-line employees and customers.

 

5. Keep things functional

Today’s applications are SaaS, meaning vendors manage the infrastructure and the application for you. All you need is the internet to use these applications. The IT department is no longer required to purchase software applications for the business. If you are a development team, marketing team, a finance team, and especially a HR team… Now you have the power to select and purchase your own software. So what are you waiting for?


We hope this guide has provided you with some ideas to get your organisation on track for the future.

Curious to learn more about anything you’ve read today? Chat to us! Call 1300 993 803 (AU) or 0800 631 631 (NZ)


Leading a business? Here’s why turning a blind-eye to technology is not an option

Our CEO, Rob Bromage, recently presented to MBA students at the University of Queensland about The Future of Work. Here’s a recap of Rob’s talk.

If you follow the excitement of the latest technologies – robotics, algorithms, Artificial Intelligence, blockchain, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, chatbots, biometrics, predictive control… The list goes on – you could be thinking one of three things;

That’s cool, but it doesn’t affect me…

Bring it on!…

No thanks – sounds scary! I’ll just look the other way

 

If you are a Board Member, CEO, business owner or a leader in a business, hopefully you are saying “bring it on” – because if you are in any of these leadership positions you are actually charged with understanding what this all means. It is your role to guide your business through one of the most technology-fuelled, disruptive, human-displacing, anxiety-charged transitions that businesses may have ever seen.

We are essentially now in the fourth industrial revolution. Ignore what’s happening around us, and your business will stagnate and be left behind. First your staff will start leaving, and then your customers will follow suit. Now nobody wants that.

Leadership is not for the faint-hearted. We all know that leadership is about strategy and decision making. It’s about looking into the future, identifying trends, repositioning the business to create new markets that didn’t exist before and of course long-term planning.

It is also overseeing the execution of these plans, testing things, adjusting, challenging ideas, changing pace and most importantly – calling the shots when it’s time to pivot. To add complexity to that, as Peter Drucker said “culture eats strategy for breakfast” and today it is widely understood, that people are your greatest assets and you need to look after them.

But – having a strong culture now goes well beyond just leveraging or extracting your people’s talents for profit. If you are serious about leadership, you also understand that today business is about accountability and being a social enterprise.

Larry Fink, Blackrock Chairman & CEO brought this to the world stage earlier this year when he stated in a letter to all CEOs:

“We… see many governments failing to prepare for the future, on issues ranging from retirement and infrastructure to automation and worker retraining. As a result, society increasingly is turning to the private sector and asking that companies respond to broader societal challenges.

…To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society. Companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.”

 

So not only do we need to think about what technology is out there, what is coming next, its impact on business and its impact on our ability to stay relevant; we must also think about all those we serve, our communities and importantly how we tackle the human impact of evolution.

Today’s future-focused businesses must be agile, maneuvering to bring workforces in alignment on masse and engaging them through purpose and inspiration. Today’s worker is a knowledge worker and they are not looking to be told what to do, but given a purpose and a direction to head in, and most importantly the freedom to execute on it.

 

So, how are you feeling about your capability to lead your organisation into the future? Whether you’re already all over it (…or not), shortly we’ll be sharing our tips on preparing for the future of work and how you can future-proof your organisation. Stay tuned!


What new leaders need to know

Stepping into a management role for the first time can be daunting, but it helps to draw on the experience of others to start off on the right foot. We’ve done the groundwork for you, and asked around to gather advice on what new leaders need to know from individuals at all different stages on their leadership journey.

Here are the common threads:

 

You won’t know everything

It’s always okay to ask for help. Just because you’re now in leadership position doesn’t mean you know everything, nor should you be expected to.

Everyone can benefit from being a lifelong learner, regardless of your seniority. So make sure you continue to take advantage of training and development opportunities as often as possible. You may also benefit from going outside training within your skill set and undertaking some professional development to supercharge your leadership skills.

 

Forget about hierarchy

In addition to continuing with training, don’t forget to keep talking to those around you and asking for help and advice when you need it. You may even go to your direct reports to get feedback on things. This is a win-win – you get an outside perspective and they feel valued.

“Put the needs of the direct report first, demonstrate trust, delegate as much responsibility as they can handle and the rest will follow naturally.”

Ian Frost, Delivery Manager

 

Don’t be afraid to foster creativity

If you want to get the best performance from your team (who doesn’t?), you need to stay open to new ideas. It’s important to get this right early. If you can help your team feel confident making suggestions from the start, this dynamic is likely to be enduring. Start by asking your team members for input on things, build mutual respect and be willing to listen when they have suggestions.

 

It’s okay to say ‘no’

While you want to encourage new ideas as much as possible, there will be times when you will need to say ‘no’. When making decisions, you must ultimately do what is best for the business. If your team member has a good idea, they should be able to justify why it’s worth a shot before any of you commit to spending too much time on it.

Now that you’re managing a team, you will also need to delegate like a pro. This means saying ‘no’ to things that aren’t adding value. You’ll want to make sure your team (and yourself) are only spending time on tasks that are of importance. Once these are being taken care of, you can make room for getting creative and experimenting on the side.

 

Data is your friend

In order to be an effective leader (and prove your effectiveness) you’ll need access to the right data. Decide on the priorities for your team and how you will measure success, then make sure you’re tracking these results from the start. Having these insights will also help you recognise which of your team members are excelling and who may need help.

“Get the Data – don’t manage on gut instinct, determine what the key metrics are, determine the current pattern, help your team understand how they contribute to it, make it important, set targets, and measure.”

Paul Trappett, COO

 

Don’t forget to be human

Automation is on the rise and it’s giving us more time to spend on the tasks where we can really add value. Showing empathy and having emotional intelligence are two things that you can never outsource or automate so be sure to constantly work on and develop these skills. Being approachable and understanding will also help foster trust and honesty within your team. Checking in with your team frequently and showing an interest in how they are going,  is an important habit to get into to show your team you care.

 

You will make mistakes

Part of being human also means you will make mistakes. No one gets it right every time, not even the boss (that’s you)! Mistakes happen, but what matters is that you’re upfront and honest with your team. Acknowledge that you missed that mark and explain what you’re doing to fix the situation. This also sets a good example for your team, wouldn’t you want them to do the same for you?

“Lead by example. Always”

Alan Soto, Agile Coach

 

These were our top pieces of advice for new leaders, what would you add to the list?


Why leadership skills are important for managers

Promoting any team member to their first management role is often regarded as the peak of recognition, but leadership isn’t a responsibility that should just be freely bestowed to anyone capable of reaching their KPIs. Employees with real management potential can not only achieve their own goals but also inspire others to do the same, even when it’s not required of them. It is important that organisations have processes to carefully identify and nurture this leadership potential when it is displayed.

 

How to spot leadership potential

There are a number of ways we can identify leadership potential within current employees, to determine who is best suited to future management opportunities. Employees with strong leadership potential may display the following behaviours:

 

They are willing to help others

Employees who go out of their way to guide team members when it is not required of them have a genuine interest in helping others succeed.

 

They set SMART goals – and achieve them

Leaders must be able to give their team direction, so being able to set valuable goals and achieve them consistently is an important skill for future leaders to have.

TIP: Track goal progress with Goals Analytics

 

They are calm under pressure

Individuals who can work with limited resources or under tight deadlines will have the best chance of guiding their team confidently through any obstacles that arise. Leaders who are able to overcome challenging situations inspire confidence in teams and ensure the best outcomes can be reached in any circumstances.

 

They are reliable and consistent

While unfaltering consistency and reliability is not essential for every single role, it is absolutely essential for those managing a team. Employees who are organised and predictable in their work habits will typically have the best chance of keeping their team on track and ensuring organisational objectives are achieved.

TIP: Track which individuals are completing their tasks on time with Task Analytics.

 

They are good communicators

Finally, natural leaders are always sharing vital information with their team and know how to communicate effectively with different people. They know how to listen, show empathy and can provide honest feedback when needed.

 

But remember, leadership isn’t for everyone

Some employees may not want to become managers, and that’s okay. Reasons for this could include:

  • They love being heavily hands on in their work and don’t wish to spend time coaching or overseeing team members.
  • They don’t aspire to be in a position of extended power or responsibility and prefer to let someone else take charge.
  • They lack the soft skills it takes to lead a team but are really good at their day-to-day role.

Not everyone desires a leadership role, but for those who do want to pursue a leadership role, there are ways we can identify existing leadership skills and develop further skills in the right people.

 

How to develop leaders

Sometimes, individuals who really desire a leadership role may not display all of these traits right now, but with commitment and the right training, many of these skills can be developed.

Here are some steps you can take to help your people develop leadership skills:

  • Foster a culture where entry-level employees have permission to go ‘above their rank’ and provide feedback, input or assistance to their superiors where appropriate.
  • Set realistic organisational-level goals and ensure people have the resources to achieve them.
  • Ensure every employee has access to a tool to set and track shared goals with their team.
  • Use a tools like Slack or similar to help employees communicate efficiently.
  • Provide all leadership hopefuls with a test to measure their emotional intelligence and offer assistance to develop this further if required.

Learn more about the skills leaders need in today’s workplace, with our next post – What skills do leaders need today?

 


How to measure leadership skills

We all know the importance of strong leadership skills in the workplace, but like most soft skills, they are all too often overlooked. This is usually due to a perception that leadership skills are difficult to measure, but this doesn’t have to be the case.

Today we’ll explore how to measure leadership skills and look at three metrics to start tracking in your own organisation.

 

Quality data in, quality insights out

Yes, leadership skills are difficult to measure – if you lack relevant data. With the right insights at your disposal though, it is possible to quantify leadership ability.

Leadership skills can reveal themselves in almost any everyday situation, so finding leadership behaviors is much easier with a centralised HR platform, where tasks get completed and behaviors are tracked and analysed in one place.

This way you know that everytime someone progresses on a goal, completes a feedback form, records training or makes a diary note, this along with other activity is being tracked and reported on in real-time, giving you full visibility over your people and the depth of their leadership ability.

This also creates a more even playing field as every one of your people has the same opportunity to be recognised for what they’re doing, even if they have limited face-time with others. Think about staff who work remotely or have a manager who is often out of the office; their efforts could easily go unnoticed due to lack of visibility. With real-time data accessible 24/7, nothing has to go unnoticed.

 

How to measure leadership skills

Now that you’re collecting the data you need, it’s time to extract the relevant insights into the ability of your leaders.

 

Look at goal progress

A good leader not only achieves their own goals, but also ensures their team members are achieving theirs.

Use goal analytics to cross-filter by supervisor and get an overview of performance across each manager’s team. This will tell you:

  • What percentage of team members have active goals
  • A breakdown of progress status across the team’s goals
  • A breakdown of what category the team’s goals fit under – are they strategic, operational or for personal development?

If the individuals within a team are consistently not setting goals or making progress this might signal a need for further development in their leader. Likewise, leaders with teams that are consistently achieving their goals can mentor others in the business and help replicate their success in other teams.

 

Monitor morale

Gone are the days of poor staff morale going unnoticed, now leaders can be accountable for employee engagement levels in their team and be recognised for making a positive impact.

Using sentiment and happiness analytics, filter by supervisor to see how a manager’s team is feeling at work.

  • Happiness analytics looks at happiness ratings provided by employees in their feedback responses, and also provides a summary of keywords contributing to these ratings.
  • Sentiment analysis looks at the emotional tone of employees when writing comments or completing forms within intelliHR. This is then assigned a score telling us how negative or positive their responses are.

By looking at these insights you can spot trends in teams under certain supervisors and derive the source of particularly positive (or negative) results.

It’s important to note that many external factors can affect happiness ratings or sentiment scores for employees, but coupled with additional leadership measures, these results can provide additional insight into a manager’s ability to lead their team to success.

 

Consider task completion

Organisation skills are imperative for managers to ensure their team is meeting deadlines and important tasks aren’t slipping through the cracks.

Using task analytics, cross-filter by supervisor to see response times and completion rates for key tasks like providing continuous feedback or completing compliance tasks.

When leaders consistently complete all tasks within an acceptable time frame, we can see they recognise the importance of vital processes and take their responsibilities as a leader seriously.

 

Data + understanding = a recipe for success

When you have access to the right data and the analytics tools to break it down for you, measuring leadership skills is not only possible but actually quick and easy too.

How will you measure leadership skills in your organisation?

 


What skills do leaders need today?

Leadership skills are essential for every individual in an organisation, whether they manage a team or not. In this article we will look at seven core skills leaders need today and how you can help your people develop them.

 

What skills do leaders need?

1. Fearlessness

Fearless leaders are willing to push the boundaries, try new things and pave the way for more effective ways of working. Without fearlessness, organisations can easily become stuck in deep-rooted processes that don’t work, or fade into obscurity out of failing to do anything new that sets them apart from competitors.

How to create fearless leaders

It’s important to foster a culture where individuals have the freedom to try new ideas. This goes further than simply letting employees make suggestions, these ideas must actually be carefully considered and acted on when appropriate. Over time this sets an example that everyone should feel safe to express their ideas and that they will be listened to if they do so.

 

2. Vision Sharing

No surprises here, leaders need a clear direction or vision to focus their efforts, as well as the efforts of their team. Even if the leader themselves has a clear vision, this is fruitless if their team members do not have their own clear goals to help them contribute.

How to help leaders share their vision

Ensure all leaders have access to a tool to set cascadable goals and allow their team to set and track complementary goals. This will help provide a clear direction for everyone and measure progress to hold teams accountable.

 

3. Agility and Adaptability

While the shared vision of a team should stay consistent over time, the tactics used to achieve this vision will inevitably need to pivot and shift in response to different environmental factors. Leaders who have the ability to be agile and adapt to situations will be able to guide their teams to success even when challenges arise.

How to create agile leaders

Workplaces that prioritise outcomes over tactics and give employees permission to try new things are the best environment to foster agile leaders. Open communication and continuous feedback will also help leaders identify when change is needed and keep their team up to date with what needs to happen.

 

4. Swift Decision Making

In order to make these decisions on the fly, leaders need to be data-driven and know how to base their next decision on relevant statistics. When leaders are delayed in choosing their next move, businesses can lose competitive advantage or miss out on opportunities.

How to aid leaders with decision making

It’s imperative that leaders have access to real-time data that can advise them to make strategic decisions, ideally via an easy to use dashboard. This relies on an organisation-wide commitment to gather data in a central platform so everyone can access the key business insights they require.

 

5. Emotional Intelligence

One of the biggest skills that sets apart true leaders from the average manager is emotional intelligence or EQ. With EQ, leaders can really understand their team members and look under the surface to identify deeper issues that might be affecting them positively or negatively at work. Leaders with a high EQ can also communicate better with the people around them as they understand how to appeal to different personality types and use the right methods of communication to get their message across.

How to maintain a leadership team with high EQ

Before any manager is hired or an employee is promoted to a management role, emotional intelligence should be considered as a non-negotiable skill the individual must possess. Emotional intelligence is usually an innate skill but it can be further developed over time with the right training. A leader’s EQ can be measured through testing, and those who do lack emotional intelligence should be supported with relevant training to hone this skill.

 

6. Communication

On top of emotional intelligence, general communication skills are a must for all leaders. In addition to understanding the best method of communication to use with different people, good leaders also prioritise timeliness and inclusion. This means always distributing key information as quickly as possible and sharing it with all relevant stakeholders in an equitable way. It also means having a channel to communicate with team members one on one and creating a safe environment for them to speak to you directly and in private if they need to.

How to help leaders communicate

The right tools can make it much easier for leaders to communicate fairly to their teams. Having a team Slack channel or similar can be a good way to share quick updates with your whole team and ensure everyone has access to the same information. Tools like pulses can also be used to send regular check-in forms to employees and ask how they are going. The responses to these should be available to relevant managers and be followed up with a face to face catch up between a manager and each of their direct reports every one or to weeks.

 

7. Integrity and Honesty

None of the aforementioned skills mean a thing if they are not underpinned by honesty and integrity. Employees must ultimately be able to trust their leaders and be confident they will follow through on what they say and be consistent.

How to create honest leaders

While honesty and integrity are usually innate qualities, there are some external factors we can control to help foster integrity and consistency and limit people turning to dishonest means. Workplaces that set realistic performance expectations and reward measured risk-taking (even if it doesn’t always produce results) are typically environments that allow honest leaders to thrive.

These are the core skills we believe are needed for today’s leaders in the workplace. What skills do you think are important for leaders? Let us know in the comments.