Features
Company
Partners
Resources

Features
Company
Partners
Resources
Features
Company
Partners
Resources

Features
Company
Partners
Resources

Company

Inside intelliHR

intelliHR is a people technology company based in Brisbane, Australia.

Explore intelliHR
Features
Company
Partners
Resources

Features
Company
Partners
Resources

Partners

intelliHR Partner Program

Learn about our partner program, or apply to become an intelliHR partner.

Learn More
Features
Company
Partners
Resources

Features
Company
Partners
Resources
See how intelliHR can help you.
GET A DEMO

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY OF 10,000+ USERS

Schedule a Demo.
Want to see how intelli can help you?
Are you using filing cabinets and spreadsheets for your people management system?

You don't need to anymore! intelliHR is your all-in-one cloud-based intelligent people management platform.

We're here to simplify people management and HR for you.
  • Sarah Gatehouse

    Sarah Gatehouse.

    Fujitsu General Australia

    "In 2016 we rolled out intelliHR, and in 2017 we had our best financial year yet. That makes a massive statement to show how valuable an investment in people and technology can be."

  • Sarah Gatehouse

    Sarah Gatehouse.

    Fujitsu General Australia

    "With the implementation of intelliHR, the improvements in our culture are clearly visible. intelliHR is a tool that helps with our strategic cultural goal of being a great place to work, with improved engagement, communication and goal management now well on track."

  • Belinda Maybury

    Belinda Maybury.

    Sheldon Commercial Interiors

    "

    Since starting regular staff check-ins through intelliHR, we discovered how much more capability one staff member had than we initially thought. We have since assisted his career progression and conducted a remuneration review. The outcome was a happy employee feeling valued and appreciated. Without intelliHR prompting us to address this in real-time, we could have lost this valuable employee.

    "

TopBorderCurve

Customers

Join other industry leaders

These businesses get the best out of their talent from using intelliHR.

| 5 min
7 Reasons we all need feedback at work
We all know feedback is key to any great workplace, but what is it exactly that makes an effective feedback process so successful in improving performance? Today we explore some research around feedback at...
| 5 min
4 Feedback questions every employer must ask
At intelliHR, we passionately believe helping you capture great feedback, respond to it, and easily gain insights, is central to how we add value to your organisation. We recommend a light and regular feedback...
| 5 min
How to give your people effective feedback
We all know feedback is important, but actually delivering it to your people is a critical leadership skill that without appropriate support can take a lot of time, and doesn’t come naturally to everyone....
| 5 min
Video: Pendleton Feedback Model
Transcript: Hey guys I’m Paddy from the customer success team and intelliHR and today I’m here to talk about giving feedback. There’s a really cool framework around that help leaders structure really effective and...
| 5 min
How to avoid bias in continuous feedback
Here on the Insights blog, we often talk about the benefits of continuous employee feedback, but the value you get from this process is only as good as the questions you ask.  When continuous...
| 5 min
5 Feedback mistakes that kill employee engagement
Feedback. We all know we should be doing it, but sometimes going about it the wrong way can be worse than not doing it at all. With the advent of advanced system-based feedback tools...

7 Reasons we all need feedback at work

We all know feedback is key to any great workplace, but what is it exactly that makes an effective feedback process so successful in improving performance? Today we explore some research around feedback at work and why it’s necessary for everyone in an organisation, employees and managers included!

 

People want constructive criticism

92% of employees believe negative (development) feedback, delivered correctly, helps improve their performance.

Harvard Business Review

 

While it’s always great to receive recognition and encouragement, it’s also critical to get honest feedback when there is room for improvement. After all, this is how we improve!

The key here is to be selective about what feedback is genuinely constructive and worth raising, and then delivering it in the right way. The most important thing is to ensure individuals know that the purpose of the feedback is to help them improve, and that your job as their manager is to provide the support they need to get there.

 

People want help

When negative feedback is delivered, 74% of people already know there is a problem.

Harvard Business Review

 

It can be really difficult to deliver constructive feedback, especially if we feel it might come as a shock to our team members. According to this research though, the majority of people already know an issue is at hand when their manager brings it up. In fact, starting the conversation can actually be a point of relief for staff who actually want to discuss an issue and get help, but aren’t sure how to bring it up.

Further to this, The British Psychological Society found that withholding negative feedback from low performers only served to protect their manager from having to have an uncomfortable conversation, while in point of fact it actually did great harm to the individual who needed help.

 

It improves our bottom line

Teams are 8.9% more profitable and 12.5% more productive when their manager has received feedback on their strengths.

Gallup

 

Feedback is not only an important opportunity to uncover issues and deliver constructive critique, but also an avenue to encourage people in what they are doing well and create a positive feedback loop. Understanding people’s strengths not only allows work to be allocated in a way that leverages those strengths, but also allows managers to build upon them.  As evidenced by the research above, this can have considerable bottom line impacts on productivity and profitability.

 

It reduces turnover

Employees who receive feedback on their strengths have 14.9% lower turnover.

Gallup

 

We know that reducing turnover also contributes to a more positive workplace culture, improved productivity and profitability, and those who are provided with positive reinforcement on their strengths at work have almost 15% lower attrition than those who don’t. Honest two way feedback helps to build transparency and improves individual alignment with company strategy. Both of which contribute to the team member feeling valued, understanding how they can contribute (creating the opportunity for personal reward) and reducing the likelihood of attrition.

 

It keeps us engaged

68% of workers feel fulfilled in their jobs when provided with accurate and regular feedback.

Clutch

 

Consistent and thoughtful feedback also helps us stay engaged and fulfilled in the work that we do. Note the emphasis on regular feedback; if you are relying upon annual reviews you are missing a huge opportunity to engage your team over the course of the year. Employees shouldn’t need to wait 12 months to know how they’re going, or to be provided easy opportunities to ask for support or have their manager provide additional strategic alignment; they need to know all of this as soon as possible so they can act and improve.

 

It improves personal performance

Specific goals matched with specific feedback improves performance.

Journal of Applied Psychology

 

Feedback can also help individuals directly improve their performance, especially when aligned to specific goals. Having goals set for every individual employee that they can track and maintain, gives a really specific, personal and tangible measure of performance, ie. something they personally own and are responsible for, and also provides a valuable talking point for feedback. 

 

Asking for feedback makes us better leaders

There is a strong correlation between seeking feedback, and your effectiveness as a leader.

Forbes

 

A study of over 50,000 leaders found those who asked for feedback the most were also the best leaders. This is just further supporting evidence that managers need feedback just as much as their direct reports. This is why we recommend a 360 approach, so feedback can be delivered from manager to direct report and vice versa, as well as between peers.

 

Finally convinced to get your continuous feedback in order? We’ll help you map out and implement the whole process. Get started here.


4 Feedback questions every employer must ask

At intelliHR, we passionately believe helping you capture great feedback, respond to it, and easily gain insights, is central to how we add value to your organisation. We recommend a light and regular feedback process, that not only reduces the manager burden, but actually delivers regular human interactions across all levels of your teams. So naturally, we believe the questions you ask during regular feedback, and how you extract value from the responses, is critical to getting the maximum results. 

There are a plethora of different questions you could be asking your people in continuous feedback, but today we’re focusing on the absolute essentials that we believe every business should be asking in regular check-ins.

These are the actual questions we include in our own check-ins at intelliHR and recommend as a starting point for all of our customers!

 

Rate your happiness in your role?

Why to ask it

If you have a system in place with Happiness Analytics, asking this question allows you to aggregate data on employee happiness across the business and get an insight on how people are feeling at work. You can also then identify changes in trends and identify teams which may require additional support or congratulations.

 

How to ask it

This question should be accompanied by a 1-10 rating scale where your people can rate how they’re feeling at work (1 being the worst, 10 being the best). 

The benefit of allowing people to choose from a set of numbers is it’s simpler to get a measurable and absolute answer about their engagement. We also support this with the option for team members to provide some additional context to their engagement rating though a free text field below. This is important as it helps the manager understand and prepare for the catch up so they are responding appropriately. By responding appropriately, managers can build trust, and this doesn’t just mean just agreeing with the feedback. This will often involve spending some time around how their role contributes to strategy and why it has to be the way it is. This transparency helps the team member understand their alignment, ultimately driving an improved organisational culture. 

 

How are you progressing?

Why to ask it

This gives people an opportunity to leave more detailed feedback about how they feel they are growing at work and may reveal if people are feeling behind or wanting more out of their role.

This is also an opportunity to uncover roadblocks that may be inhibiting staff from reaching their goals. A key responsibility for managers is help to remove roadblocks. Sometimes the employee has to do it themselves, but often it is about coaching the team member about how they can approach things to work around these challenges, and this is often best achieved through taking a collaborative approach. 

 

How to ask it

This question should be offered with a free text field for staff to enter their own qualitative answers. This gives them the flexibility to talk about anything they need to. This provides the manager with a great basis to approach the coaching point.

To get the best quality responses, you may like to include some prompt text like “Are you satisfied with your growth? Is there anything blocking you from achieving your goals?” or similar.

 

Share your achievements?

Why to ask it

This provides staff with an opportunity to mention something they’re proud of accomplishing at work, and could help managers pick up on cause for recognition that may otherwise go unnoticed. It also neatly creates a reward by being able to demonstrate regular outcomes which can be shared. This proressive outcome focus helps build discipline and momentum toward better goals progress.

On top of this, the question prompts your people to reflect on how they’ve been performing and think about if they are satisfied with that or if they perhaps need some coaching or additional resources to improve.

 

How to ask it

This should include a free text field for employees to enter as many achievements as they would like. Summarising this in a performance summary report covering a specific time period will help team members and leaders recognise each individual’s performance over time, which is very valuable manager support for team review and coaching opportunities.

Some staff may be hesitant to be seen as bragging or feel they haven’t achieved anything significant enough to mention. Let them know this can be something as simple as “I’ve been pushing myself to contribute in meetings more” or “I’ve made the time to do some professional development and it’s really helped me improve the quality of my work.”

 

How can we help you?

Why to ask it

This is one of the most critical questions of all to be asking in regular check-ins. It’s broad and for good reason, because there could be a whole range of things someone might need to be able to do their best work. 

Often we see this being used as an area where team members can ask for manager guidance or training to resolve a skills gap that is preventing them from moving forward. Being able to support team members with training to help them to more effectively progress toward their goals develops a strong linkage between learning and performance outcomes. Given the value of this we recommend using this question to inform your training needs analysis. 

It could be as simple as upgrading or expanding their resources, like finding someone more desk space or a second monitor. It might be that an employee is experiencing a conflict with a colleague but doesn’t know how to handle the situation. It may be that your top performer is feeling unfulfilled and wants to take on more responsibility.

 

How to ask it

This question should also come with a free text field for people to mention anything that they need support in.

To get great quality answers, you could also include some prompt text here like “Do you need any extra equipment? Are there any areas you’d like extra coaching? What we can we do to help you do your best work?” It’s important for staff to know they are welcome to ask for anything they need and this won’t be looked upon negatively. Suggesting some possible areas for assistance helps to alleviate that concern and get more honest answers.

 

Wondering how you could implement questions like these in your continuous feedback process and let your people respond online wherever they are? We’d love to show you how our customers are doing it with a free demo.


How to give your people effective feedback

We all know feedback is important, but actually delivering it to your people is a critical leadership skill that without appropriate support can take a lot of time, and doesn’t come naturally to everyone. So how can we efficiently deliver effective and regular feedback, while taking some of the burden off managers at the same time?  

It is possible! Read on to see how we help our customers are giving their people effective feedback.

 

Get all sides of the story

Before we can give feedback, we need to start by ensuring we have a clear view of where our people are at. This means gathering feedback from your team and their peers so you can easily see the complete picture. Feedback should be two-way (between a manager and direct report) at a minimum, and ideally, 360 degrees (manager, direct report, self-review and peer-review). This gives a far more complete and useful view of an individual, providing both personal reflection and opportunity for coaching points, which can then be offered up by their manager as quality feedback. 

In our experience, light and regular (monthly) feedback requests are far more useful than irregular (biannual) and comprehensive surveys. By getting light feedback regularly you can build a virtuous response cycle and build team trust and transparency.

 

How to: Use 360 degree feedback

This involved regularly gathering feedback on each individual from themselves, their manager, their direct reports and their peers to get the whole picture. This information should be shared with managers and the team members themselves. This type of regular and multi-layered feedback suits using our automated continuous feedback tools.

 

Keep it Proactive and Actionable

The purpose of feedback is to help people do their best work, so in order to achieve this, feedback needs to be timely and offer opportunities for improvement. Another key benefit of the whole feedback process is being able to intercept problems before they escalate. The way to achieve this is two-fold:

  1. Structure feedback into coaching points, as derived from your 360 Feedback.
  2. Keep the communication two-way, so people have as much opportunity to raise concerns or ask questions as they do to listen. This approach quickly builds trust and transparency across your team.

On top of being more proactive, having a schedule for feedback in place adds accountability and helps ensure the process is prioritised. Regular feedback helps you capture all of the moments which contribute to each individual’s performance, as opposed to a formal annual review. It also limits recency bias and saves huge amounts of time as managers don’t need to compile 12 months’ worth of information. Having a supporting performance system certainly helps reduce this burden. 

 

How to: Send check-ins online, follow up with a one-on-one

The ideal feedback process involves an automated online check-in, followed by a face-to-face one-on-one catch up between each direct report and their manager, once a month. This continuous approach is best supported by an automated Real-Time Performance Summary which helps support both the team member and manager with an up to date picture of their progress. By capturing key moments over a period of time you can focus conversations toward providing support when it is needed, and in a way that produces further positive outcomes.

 

Give specific updates on achievements

So we’ve looked at gathering some qualitative information, and how to structure capturing and responding to this feedback, but what about giving feedback on actual performance metrics and outcomes? It’s best if you can go into offering feedback with specific measurements of actual outcomes, particularly where they are linked to specific goals or team initiatives. This makes things black and white and gives leaders the confidence to raise potential problems or congratulate staff for a job well-done, knowing they have an accurate measurement of success. It also gives employees a really clear way to see where they’re doing well and what they might need to ask for help with.

 

How to: Use goals

When goals are set for every employee in one central place online, and staff can then update their progress as they go, managers are able to easily get an accurate overview on how their team members are tracking and collaborate with their progress. An overview of this can be extracted in a few clicks, and then used to support one-on-one check ins.

 

Don’t over-formalise it

Over-formalised feedback meetings can be ineffective as they can make things more nerve-wracking for employees. This leads to them heading into the meeting in the wrong mindset, and fearing that they’re there to defend their role or explain themselves. The more someone feels is at stake from a conversation around feedback, the less likely they are to be honest and speak openly. This is why regular feedback catch ups are great, in the way they help both the manager and team member learn what is effective. In this way, emotional build up is replaced by trust and transparency.

It is also important for your team members to know the purpose of why they are receiving feedback, and assured that this is a growth opportunity for them, not a reassessment on their worth as a staff member. On top of this, getting honest answers when engaging in feedback is crucial to extracting value, especially when it comes to acting on issues that could be inhibiting people from doing their best work. The only way to uncover these is to ensure staff feel comfortable speaking openly and honestly about what they’re experiencing.

 

How to: Keep check-ins simple

Word questions on online check-ins in an inviting and conversational tone to help people feel more comfortable sharing honest answers. Keep the number of questions to a minimum (quality or quantity) so the process is quick and easy to complete, and it is also smart to make sure questions are framed to help lead to actionable next steps. Likewise, face-to-face catch ups should be kept light-hearted, think meeting in the coffee shop downstairs, rather than a meeting room.

 

Want help creating your ideal feedback process? intelli customers get guidance on process-design included, so we can walk you through it. Request a demo if you’re ready to get started.


Video: Pendleton Feedback Model

Transcript:

Hey guys I’m Paddy from the customer success team and intelliHR and today I’m here to talk about giving feedback. There’s a really cool framework around that help leaders structure really effective and meaningful feedback conversations with their employees and we’ve tried to look at a few of these in the way that we actually design our software for our customers. 

The model that we like the most and we’ve actually implemented into our processes within the IntelliHR form is called the Pendleton feedback model and the reason we like this is first and foremost because it structures a really human conversation when giving feedback to employees rather than looking a little bit robotic and scripted and most importantly because it invites the employee to actually be in the driver’s seat while they’re in these feedback conversations allowing the manager to assume the position of coach. 

So the way it works is when we sit down for a feedback conversation basically the employee is invited to reflect first on how they think their performance went, focusing first on what they think went really well and then moving on to what they think could be improved and only once the managers listen to this do they step in and start to address where you know firstly they agree with the employee self-assessment and then most importantly where they see any points of difference and this is another really cool part of this feedback model in that it identifies any mismatches of expectations on performance between the employee and the leader which at intelliHR we’ve actually identified is probably one of the key sources of poor performance when it comes to employees.

In real life one of the biggest challenges to giving good feedback is not being prepared so in our process at intelliHR we actually send out the employee self-reflection tasks a few days before the event of the feedback conversation and this gives the employee a really good chance to reflect on their own performance in their own time and in doing so and sharing this with a supervisor enough time for the manager to really prepare for a good conversation.

 


How to avoid bias in continuous feedback

Here on the Insights blog, we often talk about the benefits of continuous employee feedback, but the value you get from this process is only as good as the questions you ask. 

When continuous employee feedback has an online component like getting employees to complete a check-in form or place themselves on a rating scale, it’s vital these are designed strategically to minimise bias and help gather the most accurate and detailed answers.

Reducing bias in this process is two-fold, we need to reduce both desirability bias in employees completing feedback as well as unconscious bias that managers may have in gathering feedback from their direct reports. As always, this approach should also be focused on reducing the burden on managers, and improving their leadership skills, by helping them easily capture valuable information and easily gain insights from it. Here we’ll explore how this can be achieved.

Normally this knowledge is reserved for intelliHR customers, but today we’re going to share some of our pro tips for avoiding bias in continuous employee feedback.

 

Helping leaders limit unconscious bias

 

The first step is to centralise the continuous employee feedback process. By having a feedback form which uses best practice, scientifically-proven questions and rating scales, that is applied consistently to all employees organisation-wide, we can ensure everyone is receiving the same opportunity to provide and receive feedback.

On top of this, it’s also key that continuous employee feedback takes place on a set schedule and everyone is required to participate, ideally using an automated electronic check-in that gets sent to everyone’s inbox on a recurring schedule. 

This helps avoid scenarios where different feedback processes are happening between teams, or where a manager might think certain direct reports don’t need checking in on because they seem to be doing fine. These are common occurrences that can cause big flow-on problems in organisations.

 

What if your quiet achiever is lacking the resources they need to do their best work, but won’t speak up because they’re not sure their suggestion will be welcome?

What if someone who you think is doing just fine actually feels they are underperforming and wants an opportunity to do more?

 

These are things a solid continuous employee feedback process can reveal, but only if executed correctly. This brings us to our next major piece of advice.

 

Combating desirability bias in staff

An even bigger caveat in continuous employee feedback is the employee’s natural tendency to input answers that will be seen as positive, while being scared to give constructive feedback or admit when they need help. 

The core benefit of continuous employee feedback is being able to spot issues and help people perform at their peak, so extracting honest answers is vital. 

Companies with a healthy and transparent culture will always find it easier to get honest feedback from staff, whereas those that aren’t known to support staff speaking their mind may have a hard time. Wherever your organisation sits, it’s possible to start reshaping a positive culture of open communication and feedback through an optimised feedback process.

So how can this be achieved? One you have a continuous employee feedback system in place and are ready to set-up your master template, here’s what we recommend thinking about:

 

Be clear on the purpose of feedback

The first step to help reduce desirability bias is to ensure staff clearly understand why their submitting the check-in form and how the information will be used. This can be as simple as adding a few sentences at the start of the form to let people know the purpose of their feedback is to let their manager know how they can better support the team, where recognition is needed and what resources might be lacking. 

 

Use multi-choice options

Allowing people to answer questions from a set of choices helps them complete the form faster (increasing adoption rates), while also communicating what the expected or “normal” answers might be. If the answer an employee wants to give has been made available as an option, this signals to them that it’s okay to make the selection.

 

Ensure there are no ‘right’ answers

An exception to this would be if certain answers sound “better” than others or there seems to be a clear correct answer that managers want to see. Word all options carefully to take out any emotive language and ensure one answer doesn’t appear to be the best. This can be achieved by asking simple and open questions which are designed to encourage open feedback. A good example might be ‘Is there anything your manager could do more or less of?’, with a free text response.

 

Provide free text fields

On top of your multi-choice options, offering optional free text fields for people to elaborate on their answers will not only gather you more valuable qualitative data but will help build confidence in respondents by letting them give more of their side of the story.

 

Help people feel confident answering honestly

Another really crucial tip to help people answer honestly is to avoid making people choose from answers that inspire feelings of shame or denial. A classic example we have seen many times is getting staff to rank themselves on rating scales worded as “under performing, performing, over performing” or similar. No employee is going to feel comfortable rating themselves as underperforming, yet these are exactly who we need to help, and we can’t do so unless they feel confident putting their hand up. 

Consider a simple wording change to this rating scale like “needs help, getting there, satisfactory, doing well, outstanding” instead. This instantly shifts the focus from admitting flaws to being proactive and asking for help when it’s needed. Small tweaks like this can have a huge impact on getting honest answers from your people.

 

Want more advice like this? All new intelliHR customers will receive guidance on this topic and more as part of our onboarding process. If you’d like to join us, you can get started here.


5 Feedback mistakes that kill employee engagement

Feedback. We all know we should be doing it, but sometimes going about it the wrong way can be worse than not doing it at all. With the advent of advanced system-based feedback tools there are many new and engaging options to capture and codify your team’s feedback. Encouraging and responding to team feedback is a sure fire way to super-charge your organisation’s culture.

Let’s look at some common feedback mistakes as well as proven solutions we’ve tried and tested over the years to keep feedback meaningful and effective.

 

Only getting one side of the story

The best quality feedback combines multiple perspectives. Feedback should be two-way (between a manager and direct report) at a minimum, and ideally, 360 degrees (manager, direct report, self-review and peer-review). This gives a far more complete and useful view of an individual, providing both personal reflection and opportunity for coaching points.

 

Solution: Use 360 degree feedback

Regularly gather feedback on each individual from themselves, their manager, their direct reports and their peers to give the whole picture. This should be shared with managers and the team member.

 

Running engagement surveys that aren’t engaging

All employee engagement surveys are sent with the best of intentions, but how often do we stop to think if these are really engaging in themselves?

The major caveat of traditional engagement surveys is they are infrequent, typically long-winded, and therefore a bit of a pain to complete. These factors end up resulting in a low adoption rate, providing low quality (and outdated) data. This also has the flow-on effect of not providing any relevant insights for leaders to act on. Once employees see the lack of results, they lose faith in the value of surveys and the cycle continues. This presents the ultimate irony – when employee engagement surveys actually have a negative impact on engagement and morale.

 

Solution: Send quick check-ins instead

Short and sweet check-ins sent regularly will yield better response rates and allow leaders to action feedback in a timely and accurate manner. The lighter feedback is more likely to be responded to and more likely to provide those little unguarded insights which help leaders understand what is going on. Gathering feedback in this way also allows greater agility, as a shorter check-in form can be quickly designed and sent out when specific insights are needed.

 

Only giving feedback in annual reviews

One of the most common feedback pitfalls is only engaging in feedback at annual review time. There are a few issues with this;

  1. It’s too infrequent to allow for timely and proactive decision making
  2. The process of compiling a year’s worth of information is time-consuming
  3. The feedback being given is subject to recency bias, so those involved often end up focusing on recent events rather than the whole past 12 months.

 

22% of people have cried after an annual review, 37% looked for a new job and 20% quit.

Adobe

 

Solution: Replace with regular one-on-ones

Regular check-ins largely remove the need for a formal annual review, while also mitigating these issues. The ideal process involves an automated online check-in completed electronically, followed by a face-to-face one-on-one between each direct report and their manager, once a month. If you can support this with an automated Real-Time Performance Summary then this will help support both the team member and manager with an up to date picture of their progress, helping to focus the conversation toward support further positive outcomes.

 

Over-formalising the feedback process

Another key reason that traditional annual reviews can be ineffective is that they are too formal, sending employees into these meetings with the wrong mindset. The more someone feels is at stake from a conversation around feedback, the less likely they are to be honest and speak openly.

Getting honest answers from all parties when engaging in feedback is crucial to extracting value, especially when it comes to acting on issues or roadblocks inhibiting people from doing their best work. The only way to uncover these is to ensure staff feel comfortable speaking openly and honestly about what they’re experiencing, without fear of negative repercussions.

 

Solution: Keep check-ins light

Word questions on check-ins in an inviting and conversational tone to help people feel more comfortable sharing honest answers. Keep the number of questions to a minimum (quality or quantity) so the process is quick and easy to complete.

 

Having rating scales that discourage asking for help

One of the key benefits of the whole feedback process is getting the insights to intercept problems before they escalate. This means it’s absolutely essential for check-ins to encourage employees to ask for help when needed.

One area where self-assessments can fall down, is having rating scales along the lines of below expectations, meeting expectations or above expectations. No one wants to rate themselves as ‘below expectations’, but if an employee feels they’re falling behind, it’s more important than ever for them to be reporting this so they can get the help they need to improve.

 

Solution: Update your rating scales

A simple change in wording can shift the focus of rating scales to where employees are performing now to how they could be performing at their peak. Options like going great, going okay or needs help help people feel comfortable admitting if they’re not performing at their best, allowing their manager to step in and ensure they have what they need to improve.

 

Need to overhaul your feedback processes? intelli customers get guidance on process-design included, so we can walk you through it. Request a demo if you’re ready to get started.